Publications

La plupart des informations présentées ci-dessous ont été récupérées via RePEc avec l'aimable autorisation de Christian Zimmermann
Evaluating education systemsJournal articleNicolas Gravel, Edward Levavasseur et Patrick Moyes, Applied Economics, pp. 1-31, Forthcoming

This paper proposes two dominance criteria for evaluating education systems described as joint distributions of the pupils’ cognitive skill achievements and family backgrounds. The first criterion is the smallest transitive ranking of education systems compatible with three elementary principles. The first principle requires the favorable recording of any improvement in the cognitive skill of a child with a given family background . The second principle demands that any child’s cognitive skill be all the more favourably appraised as the child is coming from an unfavourable background. The third principle states that when two different skills and family backgrounds are allocated between two children, it is preferable that the high skill be given to the low background child than the other way around. Our second criterion adds to the three principles the elitist requirement that a mean-preserving spread in the skills of two children with the same background be recorded favorably. We apply our criteria to the ranking of education systems of 43 countries, where we measure cognitive skills by PISA score in mathematics and famly background by the largest of the two parents’International Socio Economic Index. Our criteria conclusively compare about 19% of all the possible pairs of countries.

A new regularization of equilibrium problems on Hadamard manifolds. Applications to theories of desiresJournal articleJr. P. A. Soares, J.X. Cruz Neto, G. C. Bento et Antoine Soubeyran, Annals of Operations Research, Forthcoming
Online study of health professionals about their vaccination attitudes and behavior in the COVID-19 era: addressing participation biasJournal articlePierre Verger, Dimitri Scronias, Yves Fradier, Malika Meziani et Bruno Ventelou, Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, pp. 1-6, Forthcoming

Online surveys of health professionals have become increasingly popular during the COVID-19 crisis because of their ease, speed of implementation, and low cost. This article leverages an online survey of general practitioners’ (GPs’) attitudes toward the soon-to-be-available COVID-19 vaccines, implemented in October–November 2020 (before the COVID-19 vaccines were authorized in France), to study the evolution of the distribution of their demographic and professional characteristics and opinions about these vaccines, as the survey fieldwork progressed, as reminders were sent out to encourage them to participate. Focusing on the analysis of the potential determinants of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance, we also tested if factors related to survey participation biased the association estimates. Our results show that online surveys of health professionals may be subject to significant selection bias that can have a significant impact on estimates of the prevalence of some of these professionals’ behavioral, opinion, or attitude variables. Our results also highlight the effectiveness of reminder strategies in reaching hard-to-reach professionals and reducing these biases. Finally, they indicate that weighting for nonparticipation remains indispensable and that methods exist for testing (and correcting) selection biases.

The French school of proximity – Genesis and evolution of a school of thoughtBook chapterJean-Benoît Zimmermann, André Torre et Michel Grossetti, In: Handbook of Proximity Relations, A. Torre et D. Galaud (Eds.), Forthcoming

In this chapter, we revisit the origins and genesis of the french school of proximity and its evolution trough time, in order to better understand how and why the small group of researchers who were the driving force of this new way of thinking were quickly able to get a real legitimacy and effective recognition. First of all, it was clear that the role of space in economic dynamics was too often the subject of confusion and abusive assertions. Asking this question in terms of coordination made it possible to consider non-spatial factors in the analysis. The notion of proximity as a polysemic concept therefore opened the way to understanding how space matters or not, together with these other factors thus a renewed approach of questions related to space and territories. But, even starting from issues of economic nature, such an approach could not remain limited to its economic dimension, the questions of coordination involving social individuals, located in geographical space but also embedded in bundles of relationships and in institutions. Thus, it had to broaden very quickly to other disciplines in social sciences which largely contributed to consolidate the bases of what became a multidisciplinary approach and to develop theoretical as well as empirical tools.

Photographic monitoring as an interdisciplinary tool for comparing actual and perceived levels of use in protected natural areas: Methodology and ethicsJournal articleCécilia Claeys, Patrick Bonhomme, Noemie Frachon, Dominique Ami et C. Barthélém, Visual Methodologies, Forthcoming
Ricœur, Ralws and the idea of justiceBook chapterFeriel Kandil, In: Studies, Critical Theory series, Dierckxsens Geoffrey (Eds.), Brill Publishing, Forthcoming
Global crisis and financial destabilization in ASEAN countries: a microstructural perspectiveJournal articleCéline Gimet et Thomas Lagoarde-Segot, Journal of the Asia Pacific Economy, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp. 294-312, Forthcoming

This article investigates whether the ongoing financial crisis has destabilized the microstructures of Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) stock markets. Using daily stock market data from 2007 to 2010, we first develop a set of monthly country-level liquidity, efficiency, international integration and volatility indicators. We then analyze the impact of global market volatility shocks on those indicators, using a set of Bayesian structural vector autoregression (SVAR) models. Finally, forecast error variance decomposition analysis and impulse response function permit to identify the magnitude and the symmetry of ASEAN financial systems’ exposures to international shocks. Our results uncover significant and asymmetrical shock transmission channels. We draw implications for the design of future regional integration initiatives.

The effect of international accreditations on students’ revealed preferences: Evidence from French Business schoolsJournal articleJulien Jacqmin et Mathieu Lefebvre, Economics of Education Review, Volume 85, pp. 102192, 2021

This paper evaluates how three different international accreditations for business schools (AACSB, EQUIS and AMBA) affect student preferences, expressed via enrollment decisions. Focusing on the French context, we build a relative preference indicator to compare schools using data collected by the central clearinghouse that allocates students to schools. We observe that all three accreditations positively and significantly influence students, but that the impact of the AACSB accreditation is larger than the other two accreditations. Having an AACSB accreditation is equivalent to moving up four places in rankings by L’étudiant magazine, whereas the impact of having EQUIS or AMBA is similar to moving up two places. We also find a sizeable “triple crown” effect, meaning that the three accreditations tend to complement each other. Our results are robust to different ways of assessing potential self-selection into accreditation.

Economic Aspects of Settlement in the Oasis of Bukhara, Uzbekistan: An Archaeo-Economic ApproachJournal articleRocco Rante et Federico Trionfetti, Cambridge Archaeological Journal, Volume 31, Issue 4, pp. 581-596, 2021

This paper focuses on the new approach studying variations in city size and the impact that the Silk Road had on the structure of cities, demonstrated through the study of economic aspects of the Bukhara oasis. We use archaeological data, compare the ancient economy to modern ones, use modern economic theory and methods to understand ancient society, and use what we have learned about the ancient economy to understand modern economies better. In sum, we explore the past through the present and the latter through the former. Our main finding is the generation of models able to answer to the city-size distribution in different territories, comparing them between the past and the present. This study first revealed that, through Zipf's Law, we found similarities between modern post-Industrial Revolution and medieval economics. Secondly, we also found that in ancient times the structure of the city was linked with the local economic demand. We have demonstrated this through the study of cities along the Silk Road.

Integrating HIV services and other health services: A systematic review and meta-analysisJournal articleCaroline A. Bulstra, Jan A. C. Hontelez, Moritz Otto, Anna Stepanova, Erik Lamontagne, Anna Yakusik, Wafaa M. El-Sadr, Tsitsi Apollo, Miriam Rabkin, UNAIDS Expert Gro Integration, et al., PLOS Medicine, Volume 18, Issue 11, pp. e1003836, 2021

Background
Integration of HIV services with other health services has been proposed as an important strategy to boost the sustainability of the global HIV response. We conducted a systematic and comprehensive synthesis of the existing scientific evidence on the impact of service integration on the HIV care cascade, health outcomes, and cost-effectiveness.

Methods and findings
We reviewed the global quantitative empirical evidence on integration published between 1 January 2010 and 10 September 2021. We included experimental and observational studies that featured both an integration intervention and a comparator in our review. Of the 7,118 unique peer-reviewed English-language studies that our search algorithm identified, 114 met all of our selection criteria for data extraction. Most of the studies (90) were conducted in sub-Saharan Africa, primarily in East Africa (55) and Southern Africa (24). The most common forms of integration were (i) HIV testing and counselling added to non-HIV services and (ii) non-HIV services added to antiretroviral therapy (ART). The most commonly integrated non-HIV services were maternal and child healthcare, tuberculosis testing and treatment, primary healthcare, family planning, and sexual and reproductive health services. Values for HIV care cascade outcomes tended to be better in integrated services: uptake of HIV testing and counselling (pooled risk ratio [RR] across 37 studies: 1.67 [95% CI 1.41–1.99], p < 0.001), ART initiation coverage (pooled RR across 19 studies: 1.42 [95% CI 1.16–1.75], p = 0.002), time until ART initiation (pooled RR across 5 studies: 0.45 [95% CI 0.20–1.00], p = 0.050), retention in HIV care (pooled RR across 19 studies: 1.68 [95% CI 1.05–2.69], p = 0.031), and viral suppression (pooled RR across 9 studies: 1.19 [95% CI 1.03–1.37], p = 0.025). Also, treatment success for non-HIV-related diseases and conditions and the uptake of non-HIV services were commonly higher in integrated services. We did not find any significant differences for the following outcomes in our meta-analyses: HIV testing yield, ART adherence, HIV-free survival among infants, and HIV and non-HIV mortality. We could not conduct meta-analyses for several outcomes (HIV infections averted, costs, and cost-effectiveness), because our systematic review did not identify sufficient poolable studies. Study limitations included possible publication bias of studies with significant or favourable findings and comparatively weak evidence from some world regions and on integration of services for key populations in the HIV response.

Conclusions
Integration of HIV services and other health services tends to improve health and health systems outcomes. Despite some scientific limitations, the global evidence shows that service integration can be a valuable strategy to boost the sustainability of the HIV response and contribute to the goal of ‘ending AIDS by 2030’, while simultaneously supporting progress towards universal health coverage.