Publications

La plupart des informations présentées ci-dessous ont été récupérées via RePEc avec l'aimable autorisation de Christian Zimmermann
Principes d’économie politique, forthcoming, 250 pages, Forthcoming

édition critique, traduction et présentation

Contribution to a public good under subjective uncertaintyAnwesha Banerjee et Nicolas Gravel, Journal of Public Economic Theory, Volume n/a, Issue n/a, Forthcoming

This paper examines how voluntary contributions to a public good are affected by the contributors' heterogeneity in beliefs about the uncertain impact of their contributions. It assumes that contributors have Savagian preferences that are represented by a two-state-dependent expected utility function and different beliefs about the benefit that will result from the sum of their contributions. We establish general comparative statics results regarding the effect of specific changes in the distribution of beliefs on the (unique) Nash equilibrium provision of the public good, under certain conditions imposed on the preferences. We specifically show that the equilibrium public good provision is increasing with respect to both first- and second-order stochastic dominance changes in the distribution of beliefs. Hence, increasing the contributors' optimism about the uncertain benefit of their contributions increases aggregate public good provision, as does any homogenization of these beliefs around their mean.

Genetic diversity and its value: conservation genetics meets economicsNoël Bonneuil et Raouf Boucekkine, Conservation Genetics Resources, Forthcoming

Does drawing economic benefit from nature impinge on conservation? This has been a subject of controversy in the literature. The article presents a management method to overcome this possible dilemma, and reconcile conservation biology with economics. It is based on recent advances in the mathematical theory of dynamic systems under viability constraints. In the case of a one-locus two-allele plant coexisting with a one-locus two-allele parasite, the method provides a rule for deciding when and to what extent the resistant or the susceptible strain should be cultivated, in the uncertain time-varying presence of the parasite. This is useful for preventing the fixation of the susceptible allele - and thereby limiting the plant's vulnerability in the medium term, should the parasite reappear. The method thus provides an aid to decision for economic and ecology-friendly profitability.

Austriaca, n° spécial « L’école autrichienne d’économie », J. Lajarrige (Eds.), forthcoming, Volume 90, Presses Universitaires de Rouens et du Havre (PURH), Forthcoming
Introduction : à la (re)découverte de l’école autrichienne d’économie (nationale)Gilles Campagnolo, Austriaca, Gilles Campagnolo (Eds.), Volume 90, Issue n° spécial « L’école autrichienne d’économie », Forthcoming
L’école autrichienne en Ukraine. La théorie de l’utilité marginale d’E. Slutsky (à partir d’archives inédites)Gilles Campagnolo et Valentyna Feshchenko, Austriaca, Gilles Campagnolo (Eds.), Volume 90, Issue n° spécial « L’école autrichienne d’économie », Forthcoming
Ranking distributions of an ordinal variableNicolas Gravel, Brice Magdalou et Patrick Moyes, Economic Theory, Forthcoming

We establish an equivalence between three criteria for comparing distributions of an ordinal variable taking finitely many values. The first criterion is the possibility of going from one distribution to the other by a finite sequence of increments and/or Hammond transfers. The latter transfers are like the Pigou–Dalton ones, but without the requirement that the amount transferred be fixed. The second criterion is the unanimity of all comparisons of the distributions performed by a class of additively separable social evaluation functions. The third criterion is a new statistical test based on a weighted recursion of the cumulative distribution. We also identify an exact test for the possibility of going from one distribution to another by a finite sequence of Hammond transfers only. An illustration of the usefulness of our approach for evaluating distributions of self-reported happiness level is also provided.

Pollution and growth: The role of pension in the efficiency of health and environmental policiesArmel Ngami et Thomas Seegmuller, International Journal of Economic Theory, Forthcoming

This paper analyzes the effect of a pay-as-you-go pension system on the evolution of capital and pollution, and on the efficiency of an environmental versus health policy. In an overlapping generations model, we introduce endogenous longevity that depends on pollution and health expenditures. Global dynamics may display multiple balanced growth paths (BGPs). We show that by discouraging savings, a policy that promotes the pension system enlarges the environmental poverty trap. More surprisingly, the environmental policy has contrasting effects according to the significance of the pension system. If it has a small size, a more environmentally-friendly policy enlarges the environmental poverty trap and leads to a rise in capital over pollution at the highest stationary equilibrium. In contrast, in economies where intergenerational solidarity is well developed, capital over pollution decreases at the highest BGP. In such a case, the environmental policy does not necessarily lead to a better longevity and growth.

Identifying Price Reviews by Firms: An Econometric ApproachMark N. Harris, Hervé Le Bihan et Patrick Sevestre, Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Volume n/a, Issue n/a, Forthcoming

Price reviews are a potentially costly activity. A significant fraction of unchanged prices may stem from firms not reviewing prices, rather than from obstacles to changing prices per se, such as menu costs. In this paper, we disentangle these two causes of price stickiness by estimating an inflated ordered probit model on a panel of French manufacturing firms. The results point to a low frequency of price reviews, suggestive of the relevance of information costs as a determinant of the observed price stickiness. In view of the “inattentive producers” literature, pointing that the source of price rigidity matters, this is suggestive of a large real effect of monetary policy.

Biodiversity, Shapley value and phylogenetic trees: some remarksHubert Stahn, Journal of Mathematical Biology, Forthcoming

This paper explores the main differences between the Shapley values of a set of taxa introduced by Haake et al. (J Math Biol 56:479–497, 2007. https://doi-org.lama.univ-amu.fr/10.1007/s00285-007-0126-2) and Fuchs and Jin (J Math Biol 71:1133–1147, 2015. https://doi-org.lama.univ-amu.fr/10.1007/s00285-014-0853-0), the latter having been found identical to the Fair Proportion index (Redding and Mooers in Conserv Biol 20:1670–1678, 2006. https://doi-org.lama.univ-amu.fr/10.1111/j.1523-1739.2006.00555.x). In line with Shapley (in: Kuhn, Tucker (eds) Contributions to to the theory of games, volume II, annals of mathematics studies 28, Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1953), we identify the cooperative game basis for each of these two classes of phylogenetic games and use them (i) to construct simple formulas for these two Shapley values and (ii) to compare these different approaches. Using the set of weights of a phylogenetic tree as a parameter space, we then discuss the conditions under which these two values coincide and, if they are not the same, revisit Hartmann’s (J Math Biol 67:1163–1170, 2013. https://doi-org.lama.univ-amu.fr/10.1007/s00285-012-0585-y) convergence result. An example illustrates our main argument. Finally, we compare the species ranking induced by these two values. Considering the Kendall and the Spearman rank correlation coefficient, simulations show that these rankings are strongly correlated. These results are consistent with Wicke and Fischer (J Theor Biol 430:207–214, 2017. https://doi-org.lama.univ-amu.fr/10.1016/j.jtbi.2017.07.010), who reach similar conclusions with a different simulation method.