Publications

Most of the information presented on this page have been retrieved from RePEc with the kind authorization of Christian Zimmermann
Financialization and the macroeconomy. Theory and empirical evidenceJournal articleCéline Gimet, Thomas Lagoarde-Segot and Luis Reyes-Ortiz, Economic Modelling, Volume 81, pp. 89-110, Forthcoming

This paper sheds light on the macroeconomic impact of financialization in the banking sector. We develop a new stock-flow consistent model, which reveals that excessive leverage increases financial fragility, lowers wages, and slows down real sector investment and GDP growth. Using a panel of 29 high income countries, we then construct indicators of banking financialization and investigate the impact of the latter on the wage share, gross capital formation and GDP growth, using a Bayesian structural VAR framework, as well as a set of fixed effect regressions. Our results highlight that financialization has had a detrimental impact on real sector growth. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results to propose reforms to the international financial system.

What Drives European Football Clubs’ Stock Returns and Volatility?Journal articleCéline Gimet and Sandra Montchaud, International Journal of the Economics of Business, Volume 23, Issue 3, pp. 351-390, Forthcoming

The article studies the main determinants of European football clubs’ stock returns and volatility. A panel-data analysis of a sample of 24 European football clubs was conducted to test the influence of several variables, based on a matrix of internal/external and real/financial dimensions, on both stock returns and their volatility. The results show that clubs’ stock returns are influenced by the real and financial context and by a set of internal variables such as profit considered as a reflection of accounting discipline, capitalization as an indicator of size and stadium attendance as a proxy indicator of reputation. The volatility of stock returns seems particularly vulnerable to the overall instability on stock markets and dependent on clubs’ profit and net players’ transfers and, to a lesser extent, on sporting outcomes.

Conditions necessary for the sustainability of an emerging area: The importance of banking and financial regional criteriaJournal articleCéline Gimet, Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Volume 17, Issue 4, pp. 317-335, Forthcoming

The last financial crises have revealed the vulnerability of many emerging countries. Yet, within an economically integrated area, some groups of countries have been spared the disastrous consequences of these crises. The purpose of this article is to underline the similarities between these countries in order to draw up a set of regional criteria that would protect an area against speculative attacks. Using a probit analysis, we show that the convergence of some banking and financial indicators towards reference levels guarantees the confidence of international lenders, which in turn limits financial contagion. A narrow margin between the amount of external debt, in particular the short-term debt of the country and a reference level constitutes a protection against the risk of illiquidity. Similarly, a low domestic credit in comparison with the international reserves of the economy is also an indicator of the sustainability of an area for international lenders that ensures its stock exchange stability.

The impacts of standard monetary and budgetary policies on liquidity and financial markets: International evidence from the credit freeze crisisJournal articleMarie-Hélène Gagnon and Céline Gimet, Journal of Banking & Finance, Volume 37, Issue 11, pp. 4599-4614, Forthcoming

This paper evaluates the domestic and international impacts of lowering short-term interest rates and increasing budget spending on several indicators of liquidity, volatility, credit and economic activity. Data from the 2003–2011 period in the United States, the Euro zone and Canada were used to develop two SVAR models for assessing the national effectiveness and the international spillovers of monetary and budgetary policies during the credit freeze crisis. While monetary policies caused a temporary decrease in volatility and increase in liquidity in North American stock markets, the shocks were mainly domestic and ineffective at generating liquidity in the banking sector. In contrast, government spending shocks had a positive impact on credit and consumption, especially in Europe and Canada. Moreover, budgetary policies also had a positive international spillover effect on consumption and credit, especially for smaller economies such as Canada.

Endogenous Fragility in Microfinance: Evidence from IndiaBook chapterCéline Gimet and Thomas Lagoarde-Segot, May 21, 2013, pp. 63-88, IMPERIAL COLLEGE PRESS, Forthcoming
The impact of ICTs and digitalization on productivity and labor share: evidence from French firmsJournal articleGilbert Cette, Sandra Nevoux and Loriane Py, Economics of Innovation and New Technology, pp. 1-24, Forthcoming

Taking advantage of an original firm-level survey carried out by the Banque de France, we empirically investigate how the employment of ICT specialists (in-house and external) and the use of digital technologies (cloud and big data) have an impact on firm productivity and labor share. Our analysis relies on the survey responses in 2018 of 1,065 French firms belonging to the manufacturing sector and with at least 20 employees. To tackle potential endogeneity issues, we adopt an instrumental variable approach as proposed by Bartik (1991, Who Benefits from State and Local Economic Development Policies? Kalamazoo, MI: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.). The results of our cross-section estimations point to a large effect: ceteris paribus, the employment of ICT specialists and the use of digital technologies improve a firm’s labor productivity by about 23% and its total factor productivity by about 17%. Conversely, the employment of in-house ICT specialists and the use of big data both have a detrimental impact on labor share, of about 2.5 percentage points respectively.

Approachability with constraintsJournal articleGaëtan Fournier, Eden Kuperwasser, Orin Munk, Eilon Solan and Avishay Weinbaum, European Journal of Operational Research, Forthcoming

We study approachability theory in the presence of constraints. Given a repeated game with vector payoffs, we study the pairs of sets (A,D) in the payoff space such that Player 1 can guarantee that the long-run average payoff converges to the set A, while the average payoff always remains in D. We provide a full characterization of these pairs when D is convex and open, and a sufficient condition when D is not convex.

Reducing Inequalities Among UnequalsJournal articleMathieu Faure and Nicolas Gravel, International Economic Review, Volume n/a, Issue n/a, Forthcoming

This article establishes an equivalence between four incomplete rankings of distributions of income among agents who are vertically differentiated with respect to some nonincome characteristic (health, household size, etc.). The first ranking is the possibility of going from one distribution to the other by a finite sequence of income transfers from richer and more highly ranked agents to poorer and less highly ranked ones. The second ranking is the unanimity among utilitarian planners who assume that agents' marginal utility of income is decreasing with respect to both income and the source of vertical differentiation. The third ranking is the Bourguignon (Journal of Econometrics, 42 (1989), 67-80) Ordered Poverty Gap dominance criterion. The fourth ranking is a new dominance criterion based on cumulative lowest incomes.

A new regularization of equilibrium problems on Hadamard manifolds. Applications to theories of desiresJournal articleJr. P. A. Soares, J.X. Cruz Neto, G. C. Bento and Antoine Soubeyran, Annals of Operations Research, Forthcoming
A note on balanced-budget income taxes and aggregate (in)stability in multi-sector economiesJournal articleNicolas Abad and Alain Venditti, Macroeconomic Dynamics, pp. 1-20, Forthcoming

We examine the impact of balanced-budget labor income taxes on the existence of expectation-driven business cycles in a two-sector version of the Schmitt-Grohé and Uribe (SGU) [(1997) Journal of Political Economy 105, 976–1000] model with constant government expenditures and counter-cyclical taxes. Our results show that the destabilizing impact of labor income taxes strongly depends on the capital intensity difference across sectors. Local indeterminacy is indeed more likely when the consumption good sector is capital intensive, as the minimal tax rate decreases, and less likely when the investment good sector is capital intensive, as the minimal tax rate increases. The implication of this result can be quantitatively significant. Indeed, when compared to SGU, local indeterminacy can be either completely ruled out for all OECD countries when the investment good is sufficiently capital intensive or drastically improved, delivering indeterminacy for a larger set of OECD countries, if the consumption good is sufficiently capital intensive. Focusing however on recent estimates of the sectoral capital shares corresponding to the empirically plausible case of a capital intensive consumption good, we find that there is a significant increase of the range of economically relevant labor tax rates (from a minimum tax rate of 30% to 24.7%) for which local indeterminacy arises with respect to the aggregate formulation of SGU.